A Ball to the Head

Thursday was my first full day at home without any commitments since returning from Ireland. I planned to garden and open the memoir file on my computer and start to sort out my next steps in the revision process.

Instead, I got up and made a list for the day, starting with four people I wanted to call. Then I did a lot of puttering — folded our Ireland hiking maps and put them in a cupboard with all the foreign country maps I’ve collected over the years, rearranged files on my desk, filled out medical forms for an upcoming appointment, made a big pot of black beans.

Finally I opened the memoir file and fiddled with it for a few minutes. Then closed it. Looked out the window. I went out to the garden to pick flowers and make bouquets for the house, hoping that might dislodge the heavy funkiness and floating dislocation I’d felt all day.

Arranging hydrangeas in vases to dry for the winter, I thought about Chris. Two summers ago when I spent so much time with her as she was dying, the first thing I’d do when I got home was pick flowers for the house. And here it is just about two years since she died. Tomorrow is the deathaversary.

Then I got the “ball to the head,” the term Adrienne uses to describe the sudden smacks of grief you don’t see coming.

The four people I’d put on my list first thing that morning to be sure to call are all friends who’ve lost a spouse. Of course I wanted to talk to them, check in. I know how hard it is to figure out your way through the loss of a life partner. But I wanted to talk about grief for myself too, and access the rare benefit that comes from deep loss — being able to talk to others about it.

Having people to talk to who’d gone through a loss like mine was such a comfort for me after Eric died. It comforts me still.

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About Grace Mattern

Grace Mattern is a poet, writer, mother, grandmother, partner, friend, family member, gardener, triathlete, hiker and for 30 years was the Executive Director of the NH Coalition Against Domestic and Sexual Violence. She resigned her position at the Coalition on June 15, 2011 in order to concentrate on her writing, while continuing to engage in the movement to end violence against women as a consultant and advisor. Her chapbook Fever of Unknown Origin was published in 2001 and her full-length poetry book The Truth About Death was published in 2012.
This entry was posted in Gardening, Grief, Home, Moving On, Writing. Bookmark the permalink.

4 Responses to A Ball to the Head

  1. Melissa B says:

    I am sending my love and thoughts this weekend. I hold Chris in my heart every morning as I pour my coffee- I have one of her quotes taped to the inside of the cup cabinet. I Loved hearing about Ireland, and thanks for sharing such beautiful photos. Take care.xoxox

    • Grace Mattern says:

      Thanks, Melissa. I’ve had a couple of really sweet reminders of Chris recently that I think I’ll be writing about next! I’m glad you enjoyed the stories about and photos of Ireland. We had a great time. Beautiful country.

  2. arp04951@gmail.com says:

    Grief sneaks up on you, your body remembers even when your mind forgets. It’s a cellular event. I find myself feeling sad for no apparent reason, then go to my mind to figure out why. Feeling your walk through grief today, pick more flowers

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