Two Weeks to the Turn

IMG_1055There are many reasons I love The Sun magazine.  One is that they published four of the poems from my then-manuscript of The Truth About Death in the December 2008 issue.  And they paid me well for those poems.  Not only do they not include any advertisements in their magazine, they actually pay writers and photographers, as in real cash, not two copies of the issue (which is what most literary journals do).  The writing is fresh, strong, real and not afraid to tackle tough subjects.  One of my poems that they published is titled, “Death.”  Every issue includes poems, fiction, creative nonfiction, and always an interview that is provocative, timely and gets me thinking in a least a few new directions.

Part of the payment for those poems in 2008 was a free subscription for a year.  I had been a regular reader of The Sun decades ago, but that free subscription got the magazine back in my mailbox, back in my house, back on my bedside table.  I haven’t let my subscription lapse since, have bought gift subscriptions for others, and make a donation to the magazine every year also.  If you haven’t checked it out, I highly recommend it.

A recent issue included “Ten Days in November” by Eric Anderson, from a project sponsored by chapbookpublisher.com, which invited 30 writers to write 300-400 words each day for the 30 days of November, 2010, and then produced hand-bound books, one for each day by each author.  That’s 900 books.

I don’t do well with diminishing light, and I do well with assignments.  Looking for a catchy way to get myself to write every day, and any way to distract myself from the encroaching darkness of these December days, last weekend I decided to write 300-400 words each day until the winter solstice.  When I looked at my calendar I realized that the solstice was exactly two weeks away.

So far I’ve kept at it, and even named it:  “Two Weeks to the Turn.”  Without a predetermined focus for this chunk of prose I’m creating, I’m not reviewing the previous day’s writing when I sit down each day.  Whatever has bubbled up enough to get me to the desk is what I write.  I don’t know what will turn up, but I’m willing to find out.  Maybe some of it will turn up here.

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About Grace Mattern

Grace Mattern is a poet, writer, mother, grandmother, partner, friend, family member, gardener, triathlete, hiker and for 30 years was the Executive Director of the NH Coalition Against Domestic and Sexual Violence. She resigned her position at the Coalition on June 15, 2011 in order to concentrate on her writing, while continuing to engage in the movement to end violence against women as a consultant and advisor. Her chapbook Fever of Unknown Origin was published in 2001 and her full-length poetry book The Truth About Death was published in 2012.
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